More than 150 religious leaders commit to new safeguarding principles for LGBTQ+ people

28th March, 2022 11:59 am

Six key safeguarding principles for LGBTQ+ people have been agreed on by more than 150 senior religious leaders, academics and lay leaders from all over the world.

The officials met at the 2022 Global Interfaith Commission (GIC) on LGBTQ+ Lives on 21 and 22 March to agree on measures that will protect queer people who often experience discrimination by their religious communities.

Sponsored by the Foreign, Commonwealth & Development Office (FCDO), the event saw the likes of the Anglican Archbishop of Canada, the Chief Rabbi of Poland and the former President of Ireland, Dr Mary McAleese in attendance, among others.

Specially commissioned research into how harmful so-called ‘conversion therapy’ is was discussed, which highlighted how the practice has led to higher suicide rates among those who undergo it.

A total of six safeguarding principles (empowerment, prevention, proportionality, protection, partnership and accountability) were agreed on and are based on those set out in the UK Care Act 2014.

Under the measures, the delegates agreed that everyone “should be free to live a life of dignity, consistent with their sexuality and gender identity within their faith communities without fear or judgement.”

Six key safeguarding principles for LGBTQ+ people have been agreed on by more than 150 senior religious leaders, academics and lay leaders from all over the world.

The officials met at the 2022 Global Interfaith Commission (GIC) on LGBTQ+ Lives on 21 and 22 March to agree on measures that will protect queer people who often experience discrimination by their religious communities.

Sponsored by the Foreign, Commonwealth & Development Office (FCDO), the event saw the likes of the Anglican Archbishop of Canada, the Chief Rabbi of Poland and the former President of Ireland, Dr Mary McAleese in attendance, among others.

Specially commissioned research into how harmful so-called ‘conversion therapy’ is was discussed, which highlighted how the practice has led to higher suicide rates among those who undergo it.

A total of six safeguarding principles (empowerment, prevention, proportionality, protection, partnership and accountability) were agreed on and are based on those set out in the UK Care Act 2014.

Under the measures, the delegates agreed that everyone “should be free to live a life of dignity, consistent with their sexuality and gender identity within their faith communities without fear or judgement.”

Source: More than 150 religious leaders commit to new safeguarding principles for LGBTQ+ people (gaytimes.co.uk)

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